Honey production – Luxuryhoneybee http://luxuryhoneybee.com/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 19:18:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Honey production collapses in Switzerland https://luxuryhoneybee.com/honey-production-collapses-in-switzerland/ https://luxuryhoneybee.com/honey-production-collapses-in-switzerland/#respond Thu, 22 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://luxuryhoneybee.com/honey-production-collapses-in-switzerland/ Zurich beekeeper checks her bees in April © Keystone / Gaetan Bally The short spring and wet summer mean that Swiss bees have produced ten times less honey than usual. As a result, the price of honey is expected to increase. This content was published on July 22, 2021 – 13:00 July 22, 2021 – […]]]>

Zurich beekeeper checks her bees in April © Keystone / Gaetan Bally

The short spring and wet summer mean that Swiss bees have produced ten times less honey than usual. As a result, the price of honey is expected to increase.

This content was published on July 22, 2021 – 13:00

Keystone-SDA / ts

After last year’s bumper harvest, 2021 promises to be very poor: while a hive normally produces 15-20 kilos of honey, the current figure is 0-3 kilos, Swiss public radio, RTS, reportedExternal link Thursday.

“The scarcity of honey is mainly due to the weather, which was very unfavorable, both for the first harvest in spring and for the second harvest,” Francis Saucy, president of the Swiss beekeeping society, told RTS. romande.

“It rained a lot and the bees had very little time to collect the nectar. There was also very little nectar on the flowers and trees, ”he said.

Swiss honey will therefore be difficult to find on store shelves, and the few jars that will be sold will be expensive. According to specialists cited by RTS, honey will cost CHF 25-30 ($ 27-32) per kilogram.

Unlike wild bees, honey bees are important for commercial production. Yet few of Switzerland’s 500,000 farms own beehives – “they don’t make money,” Saucy said. This means that the 20,000 beekeeping farms in the country are generally run by amateurs.


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Bit-O-Honey Production Comes to Bryan | Local company https://luxuryhoneybee.com/bit-o-honey-production-comes-to-bryan-local-company/ https://luxuryhoneybee.com/bit-o-honey-production-comes-to-bryan-local-company/#respond Sat, 08 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://luxuryhoneybee.com/bit-o-honey-production-comes-to-bryan-local-company/ BRYAN – A new campus, brand new, Act of Congress, and approved union contract have paved the way for more candy production and ultimately new jobs for Spangler Candy Company in Bryan next year. Equipment to make Bit-O-Honey, the brand Spangler bought in November, is expected to be moved in the first half of 2022 […]]]>

BRYAN – A new campus, brand new, Act of Congress, and approved union contract have paved the way for more candy production and ultimately new jobs for Spangler Candy Company in Bryan next year.

Equipment to make Bit-O-Honey, the brand Spangler bought in November, is expected to be moved in the first half of 2022 from its current home in St Paul, Minn., To the Spangler West Campus (formerly known as of New Era Ohio).

“There is a lot of work to be done before Bit-O-Honey can officially move to Bryan,” said Kirk Vashaw, CEO of Spangler. “Nonetheless, we are very happy to start the process. “

“With the many challenges we have all faced over the past year, we are thrilled with this opportunity to add more jobs to Bryan and boost our local economy,” added Vashaw. The company plans to add around 40 new jobs for the Bit-O-Honey operation.

Spangler Teamsters Local 20 employees have also expressed support for Bit-O-Honey’s move to Bryan through the ratification of a new contractual agreement through February 2025 that covers the West Campus facility.

“Spangler Candy Company is very pleased to have entered into this agreement with Teamsters Local 20,” said Bill Martin, President of Spangler. “This new contract puts in place policies and procedures as well as salaries and benefits to allow a smooth transition as we integrate the new Bit-O-Honey operation.”

“Teamsters Local 20 has a long-standing relationship with Spangler Candy Company,” said Mark Schmiehausen, President of Teamsters Local 20. “We got a fair deal for our members by discussing and working on key issues, many of them are important to the transfer from Bit-O-Honey to Bryan. ” Teamsters Local 20 has represented Spangler’s production, maintenance, warehouse and sanitation workers since 1959.

Over the next year, Spangler will be making major renovations to modernize and bring the buildings at the Spangler West Campus up to production-ready, food-grade standards.

Bit-O-Honey first appeared in 1924 – the same year as Dum-Dums – manufactured by the Schutter-Johnson Company of Chicago. Bit-O-Honey is known for its smooth taffy texture and real ingredients of toasted almonds and honey.

Bit-O-Honey underwent various ownership changes between 1969 and 1983 when it was brought under the umbrella of the Nestlé company. In 2013, Nestlé sold Bit-O-Honey to Pearson’s Candy Company of Saint Paul, which sold the brand to Spangler last November.

The desirability of moving Bit-O-Honey to Bryan was also advanced by the resolution of the multi-employer pension plan crisis, which was addressed under the approved government American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). by Congress in March.

“The multi-employer pension crisis has been a barrier to any expansion at Spangler for several years,” said Martin. “Bit-O-Honey’s move will greatly help our employees, our business and our community. “

Spangler Candy Company has been family owned and operated in Bryan since 1906. Under its Dum-Dums brand, it is one of the largest producers of lollipops in the world and the only major sugarcane producer in the United States. Other products include Saf-T-Pops, Spangler Circus Peanuts, Sweethearts, Necco Wafers, Canada Mints, and Bit-O-Honey.


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The production of Bit-O-Honey comes to Bryan; Renewed union contract | Local News https://luxuryhoneybee.com/the-production-of-bit-o-honey-comes-to-bryan-renewed-union-contract-local-news/ https://luxuryhoneybee.com/the-production-of-bit-o-honey-comes-to-bryan-renewed-union-contract-local-news/#respond Fri, 07 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://luxuryhoneybee.com/the-production-of-bit-o-honey-comes-to-bryan-renewed-union-contract-local-news/ A new campus, a new brand, an act of Congress and an approved union contract paved the way for more candy production and ultimately new jobs for Spangler Candy Company in Bryan next year. Equipment to make Bit-O-Honey, the candy brand Spangler bought in November, is expected to be moved in the first half of […]]]>

A new campus, a new brand, an act of Congress and an approved union contract paved the way for more candy production and ultimately new jobs for Spangler Candy Company in Bryan next year.

Equipment to make Bit-O-Honey, the candy brand Spangler bought in November, is expected to be moved in the first half of 2022 from its current home in St. Paul, Minnesota, to the Spangler West Campus, formerly known as the New Era name. Ohio.

“There is a lot of work to be done before Bit-O-Honey can officially move to Bryan,” said Kirk Vashaw, CEO of Spangler. “Nonetheless, we are very excited to start the process.

“With the many challenges we have all faced over the past year, we are thrilled with this opportunity to add more jobs to Bryan and boost our local economy,” added Vashaw. The company plans to add around 40 new jobs for the Bit-O-Honey operation.

Spangler Teamsters Local 20 employees have also expressed support for Bit-O-Honey’s move to Bryan through the ratification of a new contractual agreement through February 2025 that covers the West Campus facility.

“Spangler Candy Company is very pleased to have entered into this agreement with Teamsters Local 20,” said Bill Martin, President of Spangler. “This new contract puts in place policies and procedures as well as salaries and benefits to allow a smooth transition as we integrate the new Bit-O-Honey operation.”

“Teamsters Local 20 has a long-standing relationship with Spangler Candy Company,” said Mark Schmiehausen, President of Teamsters Local 20. “We got a fair deal for our members by discussing and working on key issues, many of them are important to the transfer from Bit-O-Honey to Bryan. ” Teamsters Local 20 has represented the production, maintenance, warehouse and sanitation employees of Spangler since 1959.

Over the next year, Spangler will be making major renovations to modernize and bring the buildings at the Spangler West Campus up to production-ready, food-grade standards.

Bit-O-Honey first appeared in 1924 – the same year as Spangler’s iconic Dum-Dum suckers – made by the Schutter-Johnson Company of Chicago. Bit-O-Honey is known for its soft, toffee texture and real ingredients of toasted almonds and honey.

Bit-O-Honey underwent various ownership changes between 1969 and 1983 when it was placed under the umbrella of the Nestlé company. In 2013, Nestlé sold Bit-O-Honey to Pearson’s Candy Company of Saint Paul, Minnesota, which sold the brand to Spangler last November.

The desirability of moving Bit-O-Honey to Bryan was also advanced by the resolution of the multi-employer pension plan crisis, which was addressed under the government’s American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), approved by Congress in March.

“The multi-employer pension crisis has been a barrier to any expansion at Spangler for several years,” said Martin. “Bit-O-Honey’s move will greatly help our employees, our business and our community. “

Spangler Candy Company has been family owned and operated in Bryan since 1906. Under its flagship product Dum-Dums, it is one of the largest producers of lollipops in the world and the only major producer of sugarcane in the United States. Other products include Saf-T-Pops, Spangler Circus Peanuts, Sweethearts, Necco Wafers and Canada Mints.


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Kelulut Stingless Bee Farming In Malaysia and Its Honey Production https://luxuryhoneybee.com/kelulut-stingless-bee-farming-in-malaysia-and-its-honey-production/ https://luxuryhoneybee.com/kelulut-stingless-bee-farming-in-malaysia-and-its-honey-production/#respond Tue, 20 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://luxuryhoneybee.com/kelulut-stingless-bee-farming-in-malaysia-and-its-honey-production/ For most of us consuming honey is something we welcome with open arms, but approaching beehives to grow it? Not enough. While the bee alone spades as a last resort for self-defense, not everyone would have the confidence to enter honey bee colonies even with this knowledge. You might be happy to know that in […]]]>

For most of us consuming honey is something we welcome with open arms, but approaching beehives to grow it? Not enough.

While the bee alone spades as a last resort for self-defense, not everyone would have the confidence to enter honey bee colonies even with this knowledge. You might be happy to know that in Malaysia we can keep stingless bees.

Locally, they are known as the kelulut bees, and it is actually an industry that harvest 33.6 million RM in the country as of 2020, but has the potential to reach 3.03 billion RM in annual sales if developed. Therefore, we interviewed 2 kelulut farms in West Malaysia (Bayu Kelulut, Kedah) and East Malaysia (HR beekeeping farms, Sarawak) to learn more about the current industry.

A wealth of local fauna

“Kelulut bees have origins in Malaysia and have been around here for thousands of years, but were only marketed in 2015,” Amira from Bayu Kelulut told Vulcan Post.

Beehives at the farms of Bayu Kelulut / Image credit: Bayu Kelulut

“In 2014, there was a big buzz about the scientific findings on kelulut honey. If honey has been consumed regularly, it can be of great health benefit, ”she explained.

While honey bees are available all over the world, kelulut bees can only be found in countries with tropical and subtropical climates, with Southeast Asia being one of them, shared Joe from RH. Bee Farms.

Bee hives in RH Bee Farms / Image credit: RH Bee Farms

To the untrained eye, kelulut bees may share a resemblance to a house fly due to the lack of a striped body and its smaller size (3 mm to 10 mm) compared to honey bees (12 mm to 25 mm), according to Joe.

On the taste side, the honey they produce is also different. Honey collected from kelulut bees has a tangy, sweet, and bittersweet taste paired with an earthy scent.

it does not sting but it bites

Now every living thing will have some sort of tusk, and the Kelulut Bee is no different. When threatened, they bite you, but that won’t cause a bump or itch, according to Amira.

Although bees prefer to build their hives on the branches and walls of trees, kelulut bees much prefer hollow trunks, underground cavities, and wall cavities.

One advantage they have over honey bees is that they are more resistant to disease and pests. They are harmless to native species and are also excellent pollinators, according to Joe.

Where a bee eats and lives its days / Image credit: RH Bee Farms

“Kelulut bees are more informative than honey bees. According to this research, the kelulut bees will also be [explore] but do not fully exploit current floral resources. Bees, on the other hand, will exploit floral resources until they are empty and [do] exploring new floral resources, ”explained Amira.

Indeed, kelulut bees only forage up to 800 m, while honey bees forage up to 3 km, Joe added.

A lucrative but expensive bee

The size of a Kelulut bee’s body compared to that of a bee isn’t the only thing that’s smaller, in fact. They can form a colony of up to 10,000, which is equivalent to the smallest honey bee colony size.

As a result, their yield is relatively lower than that of bees. And due to its weakness, the operating costs are also higher than those of honey bee farming, resulting in a higher retail price.

While it is a blessing that kelulut bees can thrive in a tropical climate like ours, one downside is that during the rainy seasons they are unable to collect nectar due to their smaller physique and foraging distance, resulting in even lower production. .

Harvesting honey from bees (left) and inside their hives (right) / Image credit: Bayu Kelulut

However, Joe explained that the reason they would always pursue this move is because they find the current bee market too competitive. Kelluut bee honey, on the other hand, appears to be a more premium product besides having a more unique taste.

Amira intervened, sharing that their motivation was also in its medicinal value, as kelulut bee honey is richer in antioxidants than the honey of their counterparts.

Honey extraction / Image credit: RH Bee Farms

Currently, RH Bee Farms has less than 20 beekeepers with over 7,000 beehives, while Bayu Kelulut has 4,000. Both farms are supported by TUESDAY and MATRADE in R&D and overseas market penetration respectively.

At present, these two farms export to Asian countries like China, Hong Kong, Japan, Taiwan and Singapore.

Without sting but tolerates Better predators

Honey is not the only thing that attracts intruders to these beekeeping farms, as the kelulut bees themselves fall prey to frogs, lizards, spiders, etc. Therefore, beekeepers will need to take extra precautions to ensure the safety of bee hives from these insects and spider webs.

Monthly beehive audit / Image credit: RH Bee Farms

“To ward off intruders like honey-loving monkeys and bears, we installed an electric fence system in 2020 on our farms,” explained Joe. However, kelulut bees are generally more tolerant of pests and diseases.

Commercially, Amira explained that she was initially challenged by the fact that the kelulut honey did not meet the standards of the International Honey Commission (IHC) / CODEX) and the Malaysian Food Act 1983 because the standards they have are measured on the basis of normal traditional honey.

“Therefore, Bayu Kelulut and Gabungan Persatuan Usahawan Kelulut Malaysia (GPUKM) lobbied for the establishment of new rules and parameters by the government for kelulut honey. In 2017, the Malaysian Standard Kelulut Honey (MS2683: 2017) was created with the help of SIRIM, MARDI and the Department of Standard Malaysia to overcome this problem, ”she told Vulcan Post.

With all of the information Amira and Joe shared about the kelulut bees and the industry, here is a chart Joe shared that sums up some of the biggest differences between bees and our kelulut bees.

Stingless bees Stinging bees
Common name – Kelulut
– Trigone
– Bee
– Apis
– Italian bee
Distribution Tropical and subtropical countries Worldwide
Hive – Hollow trunk
– Underground cavities
– Wall cavities
– Tree branch
– Wall
Body size 3-10mm 12-25mm
Size of the colony 1,000 – 10,000 10,000 – 60,000
Lifetime About. 60 days (drone / worker) and 3 years (queen) About. 120 days (drone / worker) and 5 years (queen)
Foraging distance Up to 800m Up to 3 km
Anatomy of the beehive Built horizontally Built vertically
Honey production 300g to 1kg / month per colony Up to 5kg / month per colony
Defense – Greaves with propolis
– From time to time bites
Bites
Product Honey, propolis, pollen Honey, pollen, honeycomb, royal jelly
Advantage High tolerance to pests and diseases – High efficiency of honey production
– Longer life expectancy
Inconvenience – Low yield of honey production
– Shorter lifespan
Vulnerable to diseases
  • You can read more about RH Bee Farms here and Bayu Kelulut here.
  • You can read more about the other startups we’ve covered here.

Featured Image Credit: RH Bee Farms


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COVID-19 stings Canadian honey production, yield decreases but prices rise https://luxuryhoneybee.com/covid-19-stings-canadian-honey-production-yield-decreases-but-prices-rise/ https://luxuryhoneybee.com/covid-19-stings-canadian-honey-production-yield-decreases-but-prices-rise/#respond Thu, 17 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://luxuryhoneybee.com/covid-19-stings-canadian-honey-production-yield-decreases-but-prices-rise/ The pandemic has had an impact on beekeeping in Canada. A new report says COVID-19 has stung honey production, leading to lower yield. Canadian honey producers harvested 82.9 million pounds of honey in 2020, according to Statistics Canada. The volume represents a reduction of 4.3% compared to 2019. Statistics Canada noted that this happened “because […]]]>

The pandemic has had an impact on beekeeping in Canada.

A new report says COVID-19 has stung honey production, leading to lower yield.

Canadian honey producers harvested 82.9 million pounds of honey in 2020, according to Statistics Canada.

The volume represents a reduction of 4.3% compared to 2019.

Statistics Canada noted that this happened “because some beekeepers were unable to procure queens due to import and travel restrictions during the pandemic.”

However, the total value of honey sold increased 14.9% to reach $ 208.8 million in 2020.

In a report Thursday (December 17), the federal agency explained that the “drop in supply has pushed prices up”.

Statistics Canada has noted a decline in healthy bee colonies caused by COVID-19 restrictions on imports and transportation.

There were 746,612 bee colonies in 2020, a decrease of 5.6% from 2019.

This is the “lowest number of colonies since 2016,” according to Statistics Canada.

“Under normal circumstances, queen bees are airlifted through commercial fights due to the temperature requirements to keep the bees alive,” the agency said.

Disruptions to commercial flights have reduced the supply of queens and bees in packages, Statistics Canada said.

This in turn “prevented some beekeepers from restoring their colonies following high winter losses, particularly in Alberta.”

Alberta is the largest honey producing province in Canada.

With less production, the report noted that the price of honey produced in Alberta increased by $ 2.13 per pound.

This means that producers in the province received an average of $ 2.13 a pound for their honey.


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Talk about business with the founder of a beekeeping and honey production company https://luxuryhoneybee.com/talk-about-business-with-the-founder-of-a-beekeeping-and-honey-production-company/ https://luxuryhoneybee.com/talk-about-business-with-the-founder-of-a-beekeeping-and-honey-production-company/#respond Tue, 20 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://luxuryhoneybee.com/talk-about-business-with-the-founder-of-a-beekeeping-and-honey-production-company/

Kago Monggae

Kago’s Bees is a beekeeping and honey production company located in Ramotswa, a town 36 km south of Gaborone, the capital of Botswana. Founder Kago Monggae (29) answers our questions.

1. Give us your elevator pitch.

Kago’s Bees offers bee removal and relocation services as well as the sale and distribution of honey from our own managed hives. This year we have included beekeeping advice and management support to help hobbyists and young shoots. In order to develop our product offering, we are exploring the manufacture of cosmetic products based on beeswax, honey and other organic ingredients.

2. Where do you sell your honey?

Our biggest sales channel is to individual customers. We do business with curiosity stores and novelty stores focused on confectionery and specialty food products. In season, our customers place orders with us and we schedule weekly deliveries to fulfill orders.

3. How did you finance your start-up?

The business was self-funded. I started in 2012 while in college and was planning to try beekeeping as a hobby. I acquired bees after purchasing the first box and earned a small income while developing my knowledge and understanding of beekeeping. After several short courses in South Africa, I formally developed a business model in 2018. I injected part of my savings as initial capital to fund business operations and buy more beehives and tools and additional equipment.

4. If you were given $ 1 million to invest in your business now, where would you go?

With our current expansion challenges, I would acquire suitable land in a suitable area. This would provide the company with sufficient natural resources to populate an exponential number of beehives to increase annual honey production. I would also invest in equipment: beehive boxes, safety equipment, and operational and processing tools. This will facilitate the production of honey and beeswax.

Finally, I would use part of the funds for activities that allow the local community to cultivate and produce honey. In this way, I can expand my production capabilities and enable individuals to earn income through supplier agreements with us. By doing this, I will realize my vision of Kago bees as aggregator of honey; a company that pools honey from small producers that can be sold commercially.

A routine inspection of a beehive.

5. What risks does your business face?

One of the main risks is the legal risk in terms of human-wildlife conflict. African honey bees are much more aggressive than other species around the world. Our risk is that people will complain about the company for having been stung or inconvenienced by the movement of bees.

We also fight against theft and vandalism of beehives. We place our bees in isolated areas in rural or peri-urban settings because we want to minimize our bees’ encounters with the processed sugars, pesticides and poisons that are prevalent in urban environments.

Environmental risks include frequent droughts which adversely affect the flowering of many plant species. It limits the availability of forage for bees (flowers that bees feed on to make honey) and reduces their honey production.

6. Describe your most exciting entrepreneurial moment.

My most exciting moment was when I learned that I had been selected for the Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurship Program 2019. It came at a time when I was actively looking for ways to grow my business through additional capital.

I stumbled across the social media application process and tried it out. I have been successful and continue to learn from the program. The success of the program gave our company access to a seed capital grant which was used for additional equipment and tools.

7. Tell us about your biggest mistake.

Bees are very defensive creatures and can become aggressive. Food resources were limited at the start of this season and the bees have become very defensive against any potential threats.

I have been raising dogs for several years and recently had an incident where some of my puppies stirred up a few colonies. The puppies chew everything and discover a beehive. They started biting and crushing the bees, which caused a stinging frenzy. One of my dogs and four puppies were stung to death.

My mistake was not to restrict their interaction. There is no way to control the bees once they are at this level of restlessness and they die once they sting. It drastically reduced my bee populations in these boxes.

I learned to manage my system better. What happened to my dogs very easily could have been someone’s child or a passerby, so it is imperative that I continue to keep safety and security at the top of my business practices.

Company details


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